Posts In:

#%it Happens


※英語の後に日本語が続きます

#%it Happens

It was our first live, in-person event in Tokyo in over half a year and everyone was excited to finally practice some yoga physically in the same room together. In fact, for some joiners, it would be nearly three years since we last met face-to-face.

So, Saturday morning we made our way bursting with anticipation ready to finally kick off the event. We arrived at the entrance to the building and it looked deserted. It was dark and cold and even the 24/7 convenience store on the main floor was shut.  It seemed as though our opening day to our much-awaited event was about to be thwarted by a power outage. Now, for those of you who have lived in Japan, you know that power outages are virtually unheard of (see graph 1). But, I guess we made the Gods laugh by making our plans.

What a way to start. The elevators were down, the lights were off and the all-important security card, which we needed to open the doors once we climbed up to the sixth floor, would not work.  We were stuck. Excited participants started arriving at the entrance but the automatic doors would of course not open. Those planning to join online for the hybrid session were anxiously waiting to get in but no electricity meant no WI-FI and hence no ZOOM.

So, yes, #%it happened. But what happened next was inspiring.

No complaints, no frustration. Just everyone banding together to find a way to make the best of the situation.  The building attendant managed to find an old, physical key to get us into a lobby area that was connected to a long, clean, carpeted hallway with adjoining meeting rooms boasting large windows. Participants made their way up six flights of stairs in the dark, lugging their yoga mats and gear. And from there, everyone made it work. Together we converted the space into our very own make-shift studio with some spectacular natural lighting.

We had fortunately thrown into one of our backpacks a fully charged, back-up pocket WIFI. So, as we were all getting settled into the make-shift studio, those joining online were able to settle into ZOOM.  And voilà, just 30 minutes later than scheduled, the opening session was underway. No one was going to allow a little issue like no electricity ruin our event!

For so many of us busy bodies with overflowing task lists and unforgivingly tight schedules, a train delay, traffic on the road, or generally anything that gets in the way of things not going the way we planned, can be huge causes of consternation and stress.

But the stuff that really sticks out in life, the memories we often cherish most and revel in sharing, are the ones when something extraordinary happened. In this case, I mean literally something that was out of the ordinary like something unexpected or unplanned.  Just think about some of your fondest memories from your travels. Perhaps you walked off the beaten trail to discover some breathtaking scenery or a tiny, locally-run restaurant that doesn’t show up on Google Maps or in any of the travel guides. Or perhaps you encountered a problem – you got lost or sick – and a local or fellow-traveler was there to lend a hand.

It is easier to accept these ‘happenings’ when we are out of our regular routine like when on vacation but what if we could find some meaning and joy even in our daily lives when our regular schedule is so rudely interrupted by something unplanned?  And, what if we could create a body and mind that were more adept and more receptive to not just remaining calm in these circumstances but actually making the most out of them?

I can already hear you saying that the answer is a resounding YES! And, if you’ve read some of my other blogs, you already know that yoga and meditation are here to support these endeavors to create a more adept, receptive, and resilient body and mind.

Now, here’s some scientific evidence that may help to make you a real believer.

Functional MRI (left) showing activation in the amygdala when participants were watching images with emotional content before learning meditation. After eight weeks of training in mindful attention meditation (right) note the amygdala is less activated after the meditation training.
Source: The Harvard Gazette (4/9/2018)

The data shows that after just 8 weeks of daily meditation practice the activity of the region of the brain that responds to stressful stimuli – the amygdala – is less activated. In other words, after the practice of meditation, the brain is more resilient to being pushed and pulled around. And that’s just after 8 weeks.

Dr. Sara Lazar, a neuroscientist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, found that among participants who spent an average of 27 minutes per day over eight weeks practicing mindfulness exercises, there was a major increase in gray matter density in the hippocampus, the part of the brain associated with self-awareness. The brain actually got heavier!

There are plenty of more great studies if you are interested but what I hope you take away with after reading this is that there are two excellent ways to help you be better prepared for ‘happenings’ in life.

First, it’s all about perspective. Get comfortable with and, if possible, revel in the fact that much if not all of life is beyond our control. It’s usually not the end of the world if the power goes out for a while or your train is a few minutes late or you are not able to check off all of the items on your ‘to do’ list. There is more to this marvelous, mysterious life we’ve been given.

Second, cultivate a body, brain and mind that are much better equipped to carry you through life’s ‘happenings’, big and small, allowing you to maintain a level-head and right perspective in these situations. This will make you much more present and more able to make the best out of whatever comes your way. The how is here and waiting for you. Now, it’s just about the when.

*Notes:
Values are for 2015. The value for Japan is the total of 10 power companies.
The value for the US is the total of the summer peak.
Source: “Overseas Electric Power Industry Statistic” (2016 Edition), Japan Electric Power Information Center

ハプニングも人生の一部

2022年を締めくくる最後のイベントは恒例のアーバンリトリート!約半年ぶりとなる東京での開催でした。皆と一緒にヨガの練習ができることはもちろん、初参加の方、そして本当に久しぶりに会える参加者たち(3年以上も経っていたはず!)もサインアップしてくれていたので、毎度の事ではありますが、イベント当日をとても楽しみにしていました。

いよいよ迎えた土曜の朝。ピリリと冷たく吹く風が心地の良く、いつもより早足で会場に向かいました。冬の朝のせいなのか、半年ぶりに訪れたビルは少し暗く冷たい雰囲気。それもそのはず、なんとビルごと停電しているではありませんか!日本にお住まいの方なら、停電の事なんて事前のチェックリストに加えたりしないですよね。(グラフ1参照)。

なんという幕開け!エレベーターは止まり、照明は消え、真っ暗闇の中、重たいヨガマットやランチを抱えて6階まで階段を上がってみたものの、そうか…ドアを開けるためのセキュリティカードが使えない。

そんな事情等知る由もない参加者が続々とビルのエントランスに集まり始める時間だ。自動ドアはもちろん開かない。さらにイベントのスタートはハイブリッド・セッションであったためコンピュータのセッティングも大幅に遅れている。(というより停電でセッティングができない)Zoomからの参加者は状況が分からずにただただ待ちぼうけを食らっているのだ。

そんなこんなで、大変なことになった!でも、そのあとの展開は、感動的でした。

誰一人として不満を訴えたり、苛立った様子はなく、皆が団結し最善の方法を見つけ出そうとしたのです。

冷たく寒いビルの踊り場で待つ私たちのためにビルの警備員は古い鍵を探し出してくれ、会場へ入るために通り抜ける受付エリアまで案内してくれた。そこは自然光が降り注ぐガラス張りの空間になっていて、会議室へのアプローチとなる長い廊下には清潔なカーペットが敷かれていた。誰がリードするでもなく、参加者たちはすぐにヨガマットを取り出して私たちだけの仮設スタジオを創り出したのです。

いつものリュックに念のため、と詰め込んでおいた「ポケットWIFI」に助けられたものの、予定より30分遅れでのスタート。

電車の遅延や交通渋滞など、多くのタスクリストを抱えながらタイトなスケジュールをこなす私たちには思い通りに物事が進まない事は、大きな不安やストレスの原因となります。

しかし、人生において本当に大切なもの、大切にしている思い出、そして他の人と共有する喜びは、何か特別な事が起きた時に得られるものでもあります。今回のような予期せぬ予定外の事等、日常からかけ離れた事がそれを意味します。 旅先での楽しい思い出を改めて思い浮かべて見てください。Googleマップや旅行ガイドは教えてくれないような美しい風景や、地元の小さなレストランを見つけるために、人里離れた道を歩いた経験はありませんか?もしかすると道に迷ったり、旅先で体調が優れなかった時、地元の人やたまたまそばに居合わせた旅行者が手を差し伸べてくれた経験がある人もいるでしょう。

もし私たちが日常生活の中で、予定外の出来事によって日常生活が突然中断されたとしても、そこに意味や喜びを見出す事ができるとしたらどうでしょう? そのような状況下でも落ち着き、その状況を最大限に活用できるような、より熟練した受容力のある身体と心を持ち合わせてみたいと思いませんか?

皆さんの口から、「YES 」という答えが聞こえてきそうです。そして、私の他のブログを読んでくださっている方は、ヨガと瞑想が、さらに熟練した、受容力と回復力のある身体と心を作るための努力をサポートしてくれる事をすでにご存じだと思います。

では、ここで、科学的な証拠をいくつかご紹介しましょう。

上図のMRIは、いずれも感情的な内容の画像を見ていた時に起きた扁桃体の反応を示しています。
(左)瞑想学習前 / (右)8週間のマインドフルネス瞑想学習後
そして、(右)で見られるトレーニング後の扁桃体の反応が抑えられてるのは一目瞭然です。
出典:ハーバード・ガゼット(2018/4/9付)

このデータによると、わずか8週間、毎日瞑想を実践しただけで、ストレス性の刺激に反応する脳の部位である扁桃体の活動が低下している事が分かります。つまり、瞑想を実践すると、脳は普段と違う刺激に振り回されたり、引っ張られたりしても、それに耐えられるようになるのです。しかも、これは8週間、1日20~30分の練習をしただけの結果です。

他にも、ヨガの実践が回復力のある身体と心に関係を示す研究結果はたくさんあります。

この記事を読んで、皆さんに受け取っていただきたい事それは、人生における「ハプニング」に備えるための素晴らしい方法は2つあるという事です。

まず、視点を変える事。人生の全てではないにしても、その多くは私たちの手に負えないものであるという事実に慣れ、可能ならば、その事実を楽しんで下さい。停電がしばらく続いたり、電車が数分遅れたり、「やることリスト」のすべての項目をチェックできなくても、大抵のハプニングはこの世の終わりに繋がるものではありません。

第二に、人生における大なり小なりの「ハプニング」を乗り越えて、平静を保つことができる身体、脳、心を養えれば、今を生き、何があっても最善を尽くす事ができるようになるのです。

その方法はここにあり、 あなたを待っています。あとは、いつやるかだけですね。


 

*Notes:
Values are for 2015. The value for Japan is the total of 10 power companies. The value for the US is the total of the summer peak.
Source: “Overseas Electric Power Industry Statistic” (2016 Edition), Japan Electric Power Information Center
 

All Moments Are Fleeting. Let them fleet…


※英語の後に日本語が続きます

All Moments Are Fleeting. Let them fleet…

The Yogis tell us that each moment in life is an opportunity for us to see ourselves. For most of us, there is an overpowering attachment to the moments we most enjoy and, conversely, an overpowering revulsion to the moments we most dislike. The rest of the moments fall along a spectrum of pleasure-attachment and displeasure-avoidance. And we spend much of our lives oscillating between these two sides.

Unfortunately, clinging to these moments or trying to recapture those that have long since passed us by, is a sure-fire path to misery and suffering. Even if we do re-experience that moment of pleasure – that great meal, that stimulating conversation, that brilliant moment of success – it is doomed again to melt away into the abyss we call past or memory, wherever and whatever that may actually be.

That is why yoga philosophy puts so much emphasis on the practice of ‘aparigraha’ (non-attachment) and ‘vairagya’ (renunciation).

But the very same philosophy tells us that we are here to experience the world around us  (*1 prakāśakriyāsthitiśīlaṃ bhūtendriyātmakaṃ bhogāpavargārthaṃ dṛśyam) and that through this process, we are able to once again see our true selves; to reunite (yoga) with and abide in our true nature or Higher Self (*2 tadā draṣṭuḥ svarūpe ‘vasthānam).

As we often find with yoga philosophy, what seems like a paradox is actually the key to finding what we are looking for. 

Here’s a simple way to look at this:

  1. We need to experience, really fully and completely experience, life. That means concentrating and fighting the urge to be distracted by smartphones, SNS, bright lights, shiny objects, how green the grass appears on the other side and the loudest barking dog, whether that be a company or a person.
  2. However, we must do so keeping in mind that the moment is fleeting and is meant to be so.  In fact, clinging to the experience is antithetical to fully experiencing the present moment. You can’t be free and cling at the same time. Just watch a free falling skydiver if you don’t believe me!
  3. We observe ourselves to see if (or rather, when) we are becoming attached to the moments, whether that be chasing those pleasures (*3 sukhānuśayī rāgaḥ) or avoiding pain (*4  duḥkhānuśayī dveṣaḥ).
  4. By observing ourselves, we get to know ourselves a bit better. Just picture how children observe and get to know their parents and the world around them. We need only do the same – with openness, curiosity and no judgment – but shift the observation to the internal world.
  5. By adding a little practice of letting go of that which does not serve us, we inch our way closer to our true Self.

It’s not easy to overcome our very human need to attach. This is our innate way of finding stability, security and comfort. We get attached as babies to the caregivers who make eating, drinking and getting clean a possibility. And attachment continues through childhood and into adulthood as we look to fulfill our needs for financial stability, social acceptance and so much more.

However just because it is not easy, doesn’t mean we can’t make a go of it. We can definitely move the bar with even a little bit of effort. And there’s no rush to get it all done in one day.

Start with the realization that all moments are fleeting. This fact doesn’t make the moment less important or lesser in any way.  Experience it fully and then watch yourself as you let the moment dissipate. After all, fleeting moments were meant to ‘fleet’. So let them.

*1 Patanjali Yoga Sutras (PYS) II.18

*2 PYS I.3

*3 PYS II.7

*4 PYS II.8

全ての瞬間は儚いものだから…

ヨギー達は、人生におけるすべての瞬間は、自分自身を見つめる機会であると説いています。私たちの多くは、楽しいと感じる瞬間に強く執着しがちで、嫌だと感じる瞬間には強く反発してしまうものです。そして私たちは人生の大半をこの2つの間で揺れ動きながら過ごしています。

残念ながら、このような瞬間にしがみつき、過ぎ去った時間を取り戻そうとする事は、自分をイバラの道に迷い込ませるようなものなのです。たとえ、あの時の素晴らしい食事、会話、成功等、極上の瞬間が再び訪れたとしても、それもまた過去や記憶と呼ばれる底しれぬ深いところへとすぐに溶けてなくなっていく運命にあるのです。

だからこそ、ヨガ哲学では「アパリグラハ」(執着しないこと)と「ヴァイラギヤ」(手放すこと)の実践に重きを置きます。

しかしその哲学は、私たちがこの世界にいる理由を以下のようにも説いています。

自分を取り巻く世界を経験し (※1 prakāśakriyāsthitiśīlaṃ bhūtendriyātmakaṃ bhogāpavargārthaṃ dṛśyam)、その経験を通じて本当の自分、すなわち魂に繋がり(YOGA)、その状態を維持していくのだと。(※2 tadā draṣṭuḥ svarūpe ‘vasthānam)

ヨガ哲学でありがちな、一見納得し難い結論に行き着いてしまいそうな説にも聞こえますが、私たちがずっと探しているもののヒントはここにあるのです。

その過程を説明しましょう。

  1. 私たちは、与えられた人生を、全うしなければなりません。つまり、スマートフォンやSNS、きらきらと眩しく見える物、青く見える隣の芝生ばかりに気を取られている時間はないのです。
  2. しかし、忘れてはならないこと、それは全ての瞬間は儚いものだということ。人生を全うしようと体験にしがみつくことは、一瞬一瞬を完全に体験することと相反しています。空中を落下するスカイダイバーを思い浮かべるときっと分かりやすいと思うのですが、自由である事と、しがみつく事を同時に行うのは不可能なのです。
  3. 快楽を追い求めていないか(※3 sukhānuśayī rāgaḥ)、苦しみを避けていないか(※4 duḥkhānuśayī dveṣaḥ)、その瞬間に執着していないか、自分を観察しましょう。
  4. 自分を観察することで、私たちは自身を少しずつ知り始めます。子供が親や周りの世界を観察し、理解していくように。オープンな姿勢で、好奇心をもって、「こうだ」と始めから決めつけることなく、観察する対象を自分の内面に移すだけでいいのです。
  5. 自分に必要のないものを手放す練習を少し加えることで、本当の自分自身に近づく道が少しずつ見えてきます。

私たち人間にとって「愛着」という欲求を容易に克服することはできません。なぜならそれは、安定、安全、快適さを求める人間の生まれながらにして持つ本能的な欲求だからです。そして大人になってからも、経済的安定や社会的受容を満たそうとする愛着という名の執着が続いていくのです。

しかし、容易ではないからと言って、頑張れないわけではありません!少しの努力で、必ず扉は開きます。そして、すべてを1日でやり遂げてしまおうなんて焦る必要もないのです。

まず、すべての瞬間は一瞬なのだと知ることから始めましょう。一瞬だからさほど重要でない、というわけではなく、丁寧に体験し、見届けましょう。結局のところ、儚い瞬間は儚いためにあるのですから。

*1 Patanjali Yoga Sutras (PYS) II.18

*2 PYS I.3

*3 PYS II.7

*4 PYS II.8